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Mosquitos in Red Willow County have tested positive West Nile Virus (WNV) for the second time this summer according to Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department. This follows confirmed positive mosquitos found in Chase County two weeks ago.

 

“West Nile Virus is transmitted to humans by mosquitos. It is important to continue prevention even during the cooler weather.” states Melissa Propp, RN, Surveillance Nurse at SWNPHD. “Use insect repellent which includes at least 30% DEET,” states Propp “DEET in repellent is the most effective prevention to getting bitten by a mosquito.”

 

Additional tips will help prevent mosquito bites:

  • Wear shoes, socks, long sleeve shirts and pants when mosquitos are most active.
  • Install/repair window and door screens.
  • Empty standing water from containers such as gutters, buckets, pool covers, tires.
  • Aerate ponds or stock them with fish.
  • Use larvicide such as mosquito dunks for water that cannot be drained

 

 

Mosquitos rest in dark, humid areas and typically lay their eggs near bodies of water. The use of larvicide to treat water is one method to reduce mosquitoes. Outdoor flying insect repellent may also be utilized to reduce the number of mosquitoes.

 

More information on West Nile Virus may be found at the web site www.swhealth.ne.gov. Or call the McCook office at 308-345-4223, Imperial office at 308-882-4269. Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department is located at 404 West 10th Street – one block north of Arby’s in McCook or 501 Broadway – south entrance in Imperial.

Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department serves Chase, Dundy, Frontier, Furnas, Hayes, Hitchcock, Keith, Perkins and Red Willow counties. You may also follow SWNPHD on Facebook and Twitter.


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State Senator Dan Hughes of District 44, recently sat down with Barbie Long, Director of Community HealthCare and Hospice at her invitation to discuss home health issues. During the interview, Long not only represented the Nebraska Home Care Association, but Community Hospital as well.

 

Long had hoped to take Senator Hughes on a home health visit with a Medicaid patient, but arrangements didn’t work out. She explained to Hughes that the Medicaid patients she sees “really are vulnerable adults or kids” as she discussed the new managed care Nebraska Medicaid program.

 

In responding to the purpose of caring for vulnerable people, Hughes said, “that’s what Medicaid was designed for. No question about that. That’s what government should do; that’s part of what government should be.

 

Long mentioned the hand the Nebraska Healthcare Association has played in working through issues the new Medicaid program has brought by arranging Town Hall meetings. She fears the program may change providers in the future, “and we have to start all over,” giving the example that Well Care just got their patient portal up after a year and half wait.

 

Hughes’ answer to why he was running for re-election was “to finish the job. I’ve learned a lot these past years and I’m still learning things to be a more effective legislator. I’ve invested four years in it already. I don’t like not finishing a job once I start,” he said.

 

The two discussed the broad areas they cover in southwest Nebraska. Senator Hughes, who is form Venango, explained District 44 is “a very big district” covering ten counties: Perkins, Chase, Dundy, Hayes, Hitchcock, Frontier, Red Willow, Gosper Furnas and Harlan. “When I get to Alma, I’m closer to Lincoln than I am to my house,” he said. Long understood the challenges of covering a large area as Community HealthCare and Hospice covers seven of the same counties including Chase, Dundy, Hayes, Hitchcock, Frontier, Red Willow and Furnas.

 

Troy Bruntz, Community Hospital President & CEO, who was also at the table, commented about the hospital’s home health business model, saying other hospitals in southwest Nebraska used to provide home health services. They no longer provide those services because they were losing money. He explained the long drives and time on the road, up to three-hour round trips to see one patient, which don’t make the service profitable. “We lose hundreds of thousands of dollars on home health services each year,” he said.

 

“So why do we do it? Our mission is Regional Healthcare Excellence. If we don’t provide home health services, it isn’t going to be offered in southwest Nebraska, other than maybe our county. But we can’t just focus on Red Willow County if we are going to be a cornerstone for health in the entire region,” he added.

 

He added that since Barbie has become director of the home health department, the amount of patients in home health have doubled and nearly tripled.

 

Community Healthcare and Hospice staffs seven field registered nurses who are also case managers. Long said the field nurses have 17-20 patients each. In addition to Long, department director, Kami Foster, is clinical coordinator. Nursing aides on staff also provide services. “We really are the eyes and the ears of the physician,” she said, “as well as advocates for the patient.”

 

Long added two important reasons for offering home health: The service can help to keep patients from re-admitting into the hospital, and home care is about one tenth the cost of caring for a patient in a facility, such as a hospital. “And we all want to stay home if we can,” she said.

 

Senator Hughes said if elected to a second term, his number one public policy priority will be property taxes, “because that’s what I’m hearing most about. If you look at the demographics of the 44th district, it’s predominantly agriculture. It’s hurting right now because of low commodity prices. The way we fund schools in this state heavily relies on property tax. This has created an intense burden on the ag community.”

 

Bruntz and Long said the ag economy has also affected the hospital financially more than it ever has before. Barbie mentioned knowing some farmers and ranchers with injuries who could not afford seeking medical care due to the extremely high deductibles and co-pays on their medical insurance.

 

They mentioned the hospital offers financial counseling service and social workers to assist people in those situations. Bruntz said the hospital gives away a million and half dollars every year in free and reduced services and is willing to work with patients with medical needs.

 

Hughes said he would consider who steps up to serve on legislative committees before he would consider whether he would change the committees he serves. “There are leadership positions that are vacant that I want to make sure we have the right people in place. If the right people step up, I’m happy to stay where I’m at as chairman of Natural Resources, and Transportation and Telecommunications. I hope to stay on the Exec Board as well,” he said. “I will go where I am needed. I’m a team player and I look at the bigger picture.”

 

Long asked if Senator Hugh’s understanding of the impact of home care services on his constituents has changed since he became a state senator. “I’ve had a little bit of exposure to the doctor side of the issue,” he said. “One of the things I enjoy about being a state senator is I do get to learn about so many things. I have learned a lot and have come to appreciate a lot more of what it takes to make southwest Nebraska work and the state of Nebraska. There are so many things that go on, that unless you are directly involved, you don’t think about.” He added that the more relationships he has, in areas of healthcare for example, if he doesn’t know the answer, he has someone he can call.

 

Bruntz added that “We are always here to help” and that he believes term limits have hurt.

 

Hughes agreed that senators need at least three, four-year terms. “I’ve never liked term limits and now that I’m on the inside, they are even worse than I thought of the devastation it’s done to Nebraska.”

 

Hughes said he is sympathetic to many state issues, but “we just don’t have enough money to go around. “Several areas have taken cuts and they want them back, and I certainly understand that, but the possibility of increased revenue is pretty slim outside of Internet sales tax revenue coming in January.”

 

On a different note, Hughes said he is not in favor of legalizing medicinal marijuana. “I’m in favor of whatever will alleviate suffering, but until the Federal government is willing to do testing to see what works, I can’t in good conscience allow anyone to (use it),” he said. “It’s coming back to the legislature. Every state which has started with medicinal has moved to recreation, but it’s not a path I feel morally we should go down.”

 

Senator Hughes closed the interview by applauding healthcare workers for their dedication to their profession. “Thank you for what you do. It is a critical part of what our society and our corner of Paradise needs so we can all stay here and enjoy life.”


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NORTH PLATTE, Neb. (AP) – Authorities say a man killed at Union Pacific’s railroad yard in western Nebraska’s North Platte was run over by a fuel truck.

The Nebraska State Patrol confirmed the victim of the accident was Ryan Ziel.

Patrol spokesman Cody Thomas said Tuesday that the 42-year-old Ziel was driving the truck Saturday when he stopped to do a refueling. Thomas says Ziel got out of the truck and then it ran over him. Thomas says investigators aren’t sure why the truck started moving.

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Sheriff Kapperman advises that on August 28 th -30 th a federal trial was held in the Federal Court of Omaha Nebraska in front of a 12-person jury on charges of Felony possession of a firearm for the defendant Michael W Parsons. Michael Parsons is the individual who in January 2017 landed his plane at the Arapahoe Municipal Airport after cutting off an ankle monitoring bracelet and fleeing from felony charges from Tipton County Tennessee. Mr. Parsons was arrested on January 12, 2017 on a Tennessee arrest warrant by the Furnas County Sheriff’s Office and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) The jury trial started on August 28, 2018 which consisted of testimony from several agencies as well as some civilians. The agencies that testified were Tipton County Sheriff Office, Tn, Furnas County Sheriff’s Office, Phelps County Jail, FBI, ATF, and the United States Marshal’s. Both the United States Federal Attorneys and Mr. Parsons appointed defense attorney rested their case on August 30, 2018. At the conclusion of testimony, the judge gave the final jury instructions and closing arguments from both the prosecution and defense were made. The jury deliberated approximately one hour and returned with a unanimous decision finding Michael Parsons guilty. Mr. Parsons was remanded to the custody of the United States Marshal’s Service. Mr. Parsons sentencing has been set for December 7, 2018 in the Federal Courthouse in Omaha.


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MCCOOK, Neb. (AP) — A county attorney in southern Nebraska wants to hire another part-time deputy attorney and is asking commissioners to allow his daughter to fill the role.

Red Willow County Attorney Paul Wood made the request when submitting his proposed 2018-19 budget, which includes a budget increase of $19,020 that would be designated for the salary of a new deputy attorney. Wood told county commissioners that his daughter, Emily Wood, would be able to start Oct. 1 if she passes the bar exam, the McCook Daily Gazette reported.

Paul Wood said a second deputy attorney could help take over litigating unpaid patient bills for the county-owned nursing home, which is currently outsourced. The position could also help manage the workload for the county's juvenile diversion program amid increases in felonies, particularly methamphetamine violations, he said.

County employee policy doesn't allow a department head to supervise immediate family, but Paul Wood said state statute allows it with commissioners' approval and proper disclosure.

Commissioner Steve Downer said it would be beneficial to have the county attorney's office handle all of the county's litigation, instead of contracting out some of the work.

"We'll get comments about hiring a family member," he said.

Commissioner Jacque Riener suggested that the county's policy regarding hiring immediate family may need to be rewritten. She said the policy should include a caveat for a professional position since there's a scarcity of willing and qualified applicants.

Commissioners will decide on the budget and new role next week.

The $19,020 proposed salary for the part-time position accounts for nine months, with a start date this fall. The position's salary for a full year would be $24,000.


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McCook Public Schools

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Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department reports mosquitos in three mosquito pools have tested positive for West Nile Virus. West Nile Virus is a virus primarily spread to humans by infected mosquitos. The virus can cause flu-like symptoms such as fever, headache, rash, body aches and joint pain. It can also cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) or meningitis (inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord). 70-80% of people infected with WNV will have no symptoms are common in.

 

West Nile virus (WNV) came to the attention of public health officials in the United States in 1999. Every state except Alaska has detected West Nile Virus. WNV is NOT spread from person to person or from animal to person. It is NOT spread by handling live or dead infected birds or by eating infected birds or animals.

 

“It is important to be vigilant and avoid getting bitten by mosquitos,” explains Melissa Propp, Public Health Nurse. “There are a number of insect repellents containing products, such as DEET or Picaridin, which can help keep mosquitos from biting.”

Mosquitos rest in dark, humid areas and typically lay their eggs near bodies of water. The use of larvicide to treat water is one method to reduce mosquitoes. Outdoor flying insect repellent may also be utilized to reduce the number of mosquitoes.

 

For more information on West Nile Virus, visit the webpage at www.swhealth.ne.gov or social media pages on Facebook or Twitter. Information is also available at both offices: McCook: 404 West 10th Street (one block north of Arby’s) or Imperial: 501 Broadway (south entrance). You may reach Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department at 308-345-4223 or 308-882-4269. Southwest Nebraska Public Health Department serves nine counties including Chase, Dundy, Frontier, Furnas, Hayes, Hitchcock, Keith, Perkins and Red Willow.



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August 12, 2018 (Lincoln, Neb.) At approximately 7:05 p.m. Sunday night, Aaron Schlieker (#87675) escaped from the Work Ethic Camp in McCook.

The Nebraska State Patrol and local law enforcement were notified. The facility has been secured and an emergency count conducted. All other inmates have been accounted for.

Schlieker was described as a 25-year old white male, 6’1”, 195 lbs., with brown hair and brown eyes. He was last seen wearing khaki pants, a gray sweatshirt and gray beanie hat.

Schlieker was sentenced to three to five years on one count of burglary in Dodge County. His tentative release date is April 19, 2020. He is eligible for parole in 2019.

Work Ethic Inmate Aaron M. Schlieker was apprehended at 4:15 am on Monday August 13, 2018 by Red Willow County Sheriffs Office.

The Work Ethic Camp is a minimum security facility. Inmates are able to work in the community with intermittent supervision.

 


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The Nebraska State Fair is proud to announce this year’s Celebration Parade
Grand Marshals. The Grand Marshal Program celebrates and thanks the folks
who have made significant contributions within their county fair communities. In
keeping with our tradition to salute those who have served, a veteran is selected
to be Grand Marshal for the Celebration Parade with a Salute to our Veterans on
Labor Day Monday.
Imperial, NE
Dan Kunnemann has been selected to serve as the Grand Marshal for the
Nebraska State Fair Celebration Parade on Saturday, August 25. Growing up,
Kunnemann was involved with 4-H and FFA. He joined the Chase County Fair
Board in 1985 on which he served on the Board for more than twenty-six years.
Kunnemann also served on the Nebraska State Fair Board and the 1868
Foundation Board.
Burwell, NE
Stacie Roblyer has been selected to serve as the Grand Marshal for the
Nebraska State Fair Celebration Parade on Sunday, August 26.
Roblyer has been very involved with the Garfield County Fair. Stacie helped
bring the Traveling Nebraska Children’s Museum and the Nebraska’s Big Rodeo
Historical Museum to the Garfield County Fair.

Waco, NE

Douglas Ziemke has been selected to serve as the Grand Marshal for the
Nebraska State Fair Celebration Parade on Tuesday, August 28. Ziemke has
been a member of the York County Ag Society Board for more than eighteen
years. Ziemke heads the Building and Grounds Committee at the York County
Fair and has been instrumental in the most recent three major building projects
on the fairgrounds. He also stays very active in the livestock show at the Fair.
Geneva, NE
Dale and Jeannette Stengel have been selected to serve as the Grand Marshals
for the Nebraska State Fair Celebration Parade on Wednesday, August 29. Dale
has served on the Fillmore County Ag Society for more than forty-six years.
During his tenure, he supervised many of the building projects for the Fair
including the building of the new sheep, cattle, hog and small animal barns, the
show arena, horse arena and camper sites at the Fair.
North Platte, NE
Marvin and Jeanette Rousey have been selected to serve as the Grand Marshals
for the Nebraska State Fair Celebration Parade on Thursday, August 30. Marvin
served on the Lincoln County Fair Board for more than twenty-eight years.
During that time, he was responsible for building the new grandstands and the
two multi-purpose buildings on the fairgrounds. Marvin served on the Nebraska
State Fair Board for nine years. During that time both Linda and Marvin
organized the Grand Marshal Program at the State Fair. Marvin is also a past
president and vice-president of the Nebraska Association of Fair Managers.
Fairbury, NE
Lois Welsh has been selected to serve as the Grand Marshal for the Nebraska
State Fair Celebration Parade on Friday, August 31. Welsh has served on the
Jefferson County Fair Board for more than thirty years. Welsh is one of the
founding members of the Jefferson County Art Guild, is active in the Senior
Songsters and a member of the Blue Valley Wranglers Saddle Club and many
other organizations.
Jansen, NE
Deb Umland has been selected to serve as the Grand Marshal for the Nebraska
State Fair Celebration Parade on Saturday, September 1. Umland has been
very active in 4-H and FFA in many different capacities; she organized the
Jefferson County Agri/Business Banquet for more than nine years, helped set up
the pens for livestock and ran a successful food stand for the Jefferson County
Fair for many years.

St Paul, NE
Kevin and Theresa Jorgensen have been selected to serve as the Grand
Marshals for the Nebraska State Fair Celebration Parade on Sunday, September
2. Kevin is currently the Howard County Fair Manager, and Theresa is on the
Howard County 4-H Council. Kevin has also been a member of the Nebraska
Association of Fair Managers and Theresa is involved instructing young kids
involved in the 4-H horse club.
Grand Island, NE
Ben Murphy has been selected to serve as the Grand Marshal for the Nebraska
State Fair Celebration Parade with a Salute to Our Veterans on Monday,
September 3. Ben enlisted in the Navy in 1963 and served until 1992. After he
retired Ben has continued to serve his community through countless hours of
volunteering to numerous community organizations including the Nebraska State
Fair.

The Nebraska State Fair runs from Friday, August 24 through Monday,
September 3, in Grand Island.

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